2001 TNNAC Knoxville Caucus  nominees
(also available at http://www.tnnac.org/knoxvillenominees.txt)

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1. Teri-Lee Rhoades-Ellenwood

TRIBAL ANCESTRY: Seneca and Delaware descent
	Member of State Recognized Tribe: Cherokee Tribe of NE Alabama
	Member by blood, Western Band Cherokee enrolled people of the
Delaware Nation.
Roll number: 4521Ad

ORGANIZATIONAL MEMBERSHIPS:	Admitted to Pennsylvania Bar, May 1995

PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS:
	Pennsylvania Bar Association, Member since May 1995
	Pennsylvania Minority Bar Committee, Term 5/96 - 5/97
	Pennsylvania Civil and Equal rights Committee, Term 5/96 - 5/97

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT:
	Founder and Board Member, Oak Ridge Environmental Peace Alliance
(OREPA), Knoxville, TN. Now the Center for Global Sustainability. A
multi-group task force which addresses environmental problems caused by the
nuclear industry. Organized Hiroshima Day at the Y-12 nuclear plant at Oak
Ridge, TN. Worked for a positive social change by focusing on economic
conversion. Handled public relations with various journalists, politicians,
and speaking engagements throughout the country. Assisted with fund raising
and membership. May 1988 to September 1992/

EMPLOYMENT:
	Pro-bono Legal Advisor, Assist persons of Native American descent
with legal issues.
Staff Attorney. Appalachian Research and Defense Fund of Kentucky,
Prestonsburg, KY.
	Attorney. Teri-Lee Rhoades, Esq, Harrisburg, PA. Part-time private
practice.
	Media Director & Assistant Coordinator, American Indian Movement
	Project Director, Pennsylvania Association of Native American
Indians, Harrisburg, PA
	Director of Legislative Research, The McFarren Group, Harrisburg, PA
	Student Attorney, University of Tennessee Legal Clinic.
	Etc.

EDUCATION:
	University of Tennessee College of Law, Graduated December, 1994
	University of Tennessee majored in Sociology with a concentration
in Criminal Justice.

NATIVE AMERICAN INVOLVEMENT:
		I have been involved with AIM at various levels since I was
in my late teens. Some years I was only able to support through donations,
other years through producing literature and talks to educate people on
native issues and Leonard and of course attending various functions and
protests. My major involvement with AIM has always been the Horse Rides to
Free Leonard Peltier. I have been intimately involved with some of the
rides, most notably the 1996 ride.
	I organized, funded, staffed, and performed all the legal duties of
the Pennsylvania Association of Native American Indians (PANAI) myself,
until I chose a Board. Once the Board was chosen they steered me in my
duties. I was the "personnel" in the PANAI office. I oversaw all the daily
functions and activities as well as handled all the legal research and
writing, and advising the Board.
	I have done legislative writing on many Native American issues,
including, but not limited to funding for federal and non-federally
recognized Natives, repatriation, gaming and recognition, feather and game
laws and education. I have written on both state and federal levels.
However, I have been a stay at home mom for the last 3 years.
	In Pennsylvania and other states, I have worked hard to bring
groups of Natives together with a greater understanding of the issues that
affect our various communities. I am not saying that we achieved utopian
unity, I am saying we learned to be more understanding. In other words, the
federally recognized learned of the different issues facing the state
recognized or the non-recognized tribes and visa-versa, as well as urban
Indians learning about reservation Indians and Indians who live in Indian
territories like Oklahoma and visa versa. Of course Traditional, modern and
pow wow Indians learned of each others different goals. We attempted to
have all these interests represented on the PANAI Board.
	I have written educational papers and met with various state and
federal senators. The purpose of these educational sessions was to
enlighten non-Native politicians about our people and needs. I lobbied
successfully to have Governor Ridge declare Native American day in
Pennsylvania. I have networked with other federal and state recognized
tribes as well as other state commissions. I also researched and wrote
grants to support PANAI and to bring funding to some of our member groups.
	Since graduating from law school, I have assisted various Native
people from all over the country with a host of legal problems which may or
may not have had to do with their race. Last, over the last three years, I
have gone to various schools and other community events to teach about
native culture and history.

WHAT DO YOU FEEL YOU CAN OFFER THE NATIVE AMERICAN PEOPLE OF TENNESSEE AS
AN INDIAN COMMISSIONER?
	First, I must state what I don't have to offer. I have not been a
choice maker before. I have merely helped people make decisions. I have not
lived in Tennessee all of my life, but 13 out of the last 18 years on and
off. I have not been politically active here. If I was chosen to be a
Commissioner, I would accept because I believe the Creator had me acquire
the knowledge that I have so that I can be Creator's instrument to assist
Native People.
	I would hope that my experience in organizing and working for a
private commission would help the Tennessee Commission to move through
political waters easier by benefiting from my mistakes and successes. I
would also hope that my experience in trying to help different Indian
peoples see each others side of an issue would help calm some of the
disagreements within our communities. We can only pray for understanding
and try to openly discuss the issues. We all must listen to each other,
really hear what the other has to say.
	I would like to help reshape the legal structure of the Commission.
IO would like to see better more substantive legislation written. I would
gladly utilize my experience in writing similar legislation to correct some
legal points and to assist the Commission in redrafting some sections of
the pending legislation.
	Personally, I've lived as a non-reservation India, urban Indian, on
reservation, and in Indian territory (Oklahoma) and have seen some of the
different issues that affect different Natives in different areas. I by no
means am an expert on all walks of Indian life, I can only speak from
persona experience on some issues.

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2. John Wright Hedgecoth

TRIBAL ANCESTRY: Tsalagi

ORGANIZATIONAL MEMBERSHIPS: East TN Indian League

EMPLOYMENT: Currently disabled due to fibromyalgia & osteoarthritis. Past
jobs include certified welder & design engineer. Income from Veteran's
Disability Pension.

EDUCATION: Crossville Tech Center - combination welder diploma
	Crossville Tech Center - drafting/AutoCad diploma

NATIVE AMERICAN INVOLVEMENT:
	I haven't had the opportunity to be involved in Native affairs in a
public way until recently. My involvement up to now has consisted of
learning and growing spiritually. My father taught me many things on long
walks in the woods. Always pass by the first three or four plants that
you're hunting before you pick any. Always put the ginseng seeds into the
hole that you dug the root from and always give thanks for what you're
given. One of the most important lessons he taught me was to give back in
equal or greater amounts than I had received. I've had many, many
blessings, and it is time to give back.

WHAT DO YOU FEEL YOU CAN OFFER THE NATIVE AMERICAN PEOPLE OF TENNESSEE AS
AN INDIAN COMMISSIONER?
	To be called upon to represent a people brings about a mixture of
thoughts and emotions. There are the feelings that come with the
nomination: honor, pride, and excitement. Then the reality of the
responsibilities of the position sink in and those emotions stand out in
stark contrast. There is the travel, the time away from family & expense.
In studying the emotional highs and lows, I find balance. Balance in the
travelling to meet with you, to talk and find out what concerns you have
that I can bring before the full commission. Balance in the expense to
bring these concerns to the attentions of those who are able to do
something to affect change. The first duty of a warrior is to serve the
people and to be able to serve makes all worth while.
	This is the first time I've been able to be this actively involved
in Native affairs, but I feel qualified to be able to understand the needs
of the community as a whole. I've seen times of plenty and then there have
been some very lean times as well. I have seven children so diplomacy and
tact are terms with which I'm familiar. I've been a laborer and I've worked
in the front offices as a design engineer, and I've felt blessed with any
position I've held.
	I guess what I'm trying to say is that I've seen life from many
sides and I have a unique perspective in that I can see things as they are
and not from a one-sided angle.

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3. Tommy Veal

TRIBAL ANCESTRY: Chickasaw/Cherokee

ORGANIZATIONAL MEMBERSHIPS: Indigenous Intertribal Group

EMPLOYMENT: self

EDUCATION: High school

NATIVE AMERICAN INVOLVEMENT: President/founder of I.I.C. created to
preserve the rights of American Indians in this state.

WHAT DO YOU FEEL YOU CAN OFFER THE NATIVE AMERICAN PEOPLE OF TENNESSEE AS
AN INDIAN COMMISSIONER?

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4. James M. Yellow Eagle

TRIBAL ANCESTRY:
	Cherokee

ORGANIZATIONAL MEMBERSHIPS:
	Intertribal Association of Gourd Society of Cal.
	President of East Tennessee Intertribal Association League

EMPLOYMENT:
	Carpenter, 28 years in moves as prop maker, special fx

EDUCATION:
	4 years college

NATIVE AMERICAN INVOLVEMENT:
	Since the early 80's & late 70's I have been active in the Native
American Community in Cal. And West. In coming to Tenn 10 years ago, I have
done what I could to promote the Native American Community in this area. I
have been involved and still actively involved in the Road Fight in
Townsend, TN. I have run blockades in the 4 corners area. Taken food to the
Rez. I teach those who want to learn what I have been taught, and I still
try to learn more every day. I look to God our Creator, my elders and
ancestors to teach me.

WHAT DO YOU FEEL YOU CAN OFFER THE NATIVE AMERICAN PEOPLE OF TENNESSEE AS
AN INDIAN COMMISSIONER?
	I come with a dedication to my God and Creator, to my people, to
ancestors, to the children of the future. I believe that past should not be
turned into a 3 ring media show just to get my name in the news, or for
political or personal gain. I believe that person that get this post must
speak the "voice of [the] people." We must not have a defeatist attitude,
but remain steadfast in hor or her convictions to defend and protect our
people, customs, heritage, history & to change laws, for the betterment of
our People. I have remained steadfast, even with death threats. It was once
said a good leader must first be a good follower, and I believe this. I am
not here for myself, but to serve my God and my people.

COMMENTS:
	20 years ago, I was given ceremonial pipe by my Cherokee elders in
Cal. 12 years ago, I was given a ceremonial pipe by elders from the six
nations of the Iroquois and call the peace keeper. This has become my way
of life.

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other delegates:

5. Archie Russ

6. Jackie Rivers

7. Linda Veal

8. Corbett Ellenwood

9. Awwatokitoe Davis

10. Rahkweesheh Miller

11. Daniel 4 Eagles Russell

12. Nikki Crisp

13. Judy Wichert

14. Robert Jones

15. Theresa Burt